“They that speak not” #Poetry

Originally posted on Kamga's Blog:
Source: skitterphoto.com Fear they that speak not. Watch them. Learn their ways. But, be not like them. With extended utensils, dine. From a distance wave. Embrace, wrapped in kevlar. Fear they that speak not. Listen to their words. But watch their bodies. The lies and treachery permeate. The sickening…

Charges that are Rip-Offs

You may or may not have come across these types of charges that trump the imagination. For the life of me, I cannot get it. It just seems like some charges are trumped-up to generate money and rip off customers.  LETTING AGENTS I recently moved and discovered that there is something letting agents charge called…

REBTEL app gets a Facelift

This write-up is definitely not a tutorial on how to use the app but simply to highlight the recent changes introduced by Rebtel. Rebtel gave its app an excellent facelift at the beginning of the year. I did not see a lot of news coverage in the mobile tech space on this. I am loving…

Aluta Continua for Mozambique

Mozambique is usually referred to as one of Africa’s poorest countries. Ironically, it is one of its richest. Nature certainly smiled on the country when an estimated 277 trillion metric cubes of gas deposits and mineral coal with reserves estimated at 20 billion tonnes were discovered. The country emerged from civil war in the 1990s and became one of Africa’s best performing economies with an average growth of 8 percent between 1996 – 2008. This performance was expected to remain strong and the African Development Bank projected it at 8.1 percent for 2016. Bad investments by the Mozambican government has left it on the brink of bankruptcy. How did such a promising economy get here? They say every bad deed begins with good intentions. In 2013, the Mozambican government’s tuna-fishing state company Ematum, took a loan of $850 million from Credit Suisse and Russia’s VTB to invest in fishing infrastructure. This project was supposed to create jobs, bring in currency and provide a cheap source of protein for the country’s 26 million people. It was projected that Ematum would reel in $15million in sales annually. Ematum never reached the target touted in the feasibility report. Most of the 24 vessel fishing fleet has been left rusting by the harbour, in the country’s capital Maputo. The vessels no longer go out to sea. When they did go, the catch sales only averaged $450,000 annually. What has angered foreign donors and investors is the lack of transparency from the Frelimo-led government under Filipe Nyusi on the extent of the debt.  It emerged that $500 million earmarked for maritime security was diverted to the national defense budget. Another unexplained loan of $1.35 billion, mostly from Credit Suisse and VTB were uncovered. These loans have increased the country’s debt level to 83 percent of GDP. The government has struggled to meet its repayment obligations towards its loans and gone into ‘selective default’. Since this information became public, some multinational lenders and foreign donors suspended aid for fear it will be used to settle creditors. With inflation on the rise following the fall of global commodity and energy prices, Mozambique’s currency, the Metical, has lost about 32 percent of its value since 2015. The extractive sector remains a critical driver of the Mozambique’s economy, given the less than stellar coal production. The US firm Anadarko and Italy’s ENI have stalled their previously planned vast gas projects. Renewed fighting between the Frelimo party and their civil war enemy Renamo, worries investors. The government has downplayed reports on the recent unrest. A bail-out is imperative. The IMF and foreign donors could offer a comprehensive aid package at a cost to Mozambique. Transparency on state finances and stringent financial conditions would be prerequisites to ensure repayment is honoured. The government could rely on its newly discovered gas sector to pay off the debt. Experts believe the gas revenues will stream in, in eight years time. It will not be soon enough to pay back over $2 billion in loans due in 2021 and 2023 respectively. Nyusi’s government will have to adopt a progressive fiscal consolidation plan which will accommodate a fall in donor funding. However, Nyusi had other plans as he has been courting the Chinese for a bail-out loan. Mozambique gets a third of its government revenues from aid. The country has all the ingredients to be successful. It has potential in the renewable energy sector, particularly in biomass, solar and wind energy. Until then, it is ‘aluta continua’, as the struggle continues for Mozambique.    

Tech in Africa: Presenting Opportunities and Challenges

President Barack Obama, then Senator Obama, in his book, ‘The Audacity of Hope’, talked about his visit to the Google headquarters in Silicon Valley. He saw a huge globe screen.  He narrates that on the globe, were lights throughout different parts of the world. However, he observed that on the African continent especially in sub-Saharan Africa, there were just flickers of light here and there. Now, those lights were representative of people connected to the internet. That observation was over 7 years ago and things have since then, taken a different turn. We can confidently say for the better. The tech landscape in Africa at the moment despite its myriad of opportunities concededly has its challenges. These challenges are in turn opportunities to provide service-based solutions to the general population and that is what the fuss is now all about. The main area which has seen exponential growth in tech has been mobile technology. The latter has revolutionised provision of services and is serving lessons for the rest of the world to copy. ‘Tech Hubs – the ultimate innovation incubators’ Tech hubs also sprouting across the continent are acting as incubators for innovations providing much-needed solutions to the general populace and giving tech-savvy youth the mentorship and opportunities, including a platform to exhibit their talent and grow. For example, in Senegal, CTIC Dakar, an incubator for start-ups, provides the catalyst for ICT SMEs growth in West Africa and often runs boot camps to allow ideas from across West Africa to get pitched. During Tekki48 which ran between the 13 – 15th June 2014, three winners emerged. The first prize (500,000fcfa) went to Cauriolis, a troop of video game editors specialising in educative games for kids. Biinak, an e-commerce platform for small and informal traders took home the second prize (300,000fcfa) and Sencode & Yobantema were in third place (200,000fcfa). Sencode is out to educate literate and illiterate people alike on the road code of Senegal meanwhile; Yobantema is a web and SMS platform whose aim is to simplify shipping of baggage in Senegal. The brains behind Cauriolis – Seynabou Sylla, Sencode – Alioune Thioune, Biinaak – Aminata Sow and Yobantema – Mariama Ndiaye says the prize money should help reinforce their development team and ease their outreach efforts to meet customers or users. According to Yann Lebeux, a mentor and leader at CTIC Dakar, opportunities abound. He said CTIC Dakar has seen a lot more demands from start-ups and many with better quality offerings. The number rose from a 100 in 2011 to around 350 in 2013. So far CTIC Dakar could only work with 26 this year, added Mr Lebeux. He observed in the case of Senegal that regarding funding availability there had been a better involvement of the government – which gave them 200,000 USD last year in seed funding grants. There is Telco, an operator like Orange, which is now supporting several incubators in West Africa and few of CTIC Dakar’s start-ups. The incubator, says Mr Lebeux, has had an increase in international investment and interest from French and United States venture capitalists including business angels mostly. He did express that Rocket Internet is also becoming big in Senegal – a scary prospect for their SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises).  The CTIC Dakar example can be replicated by many countries on the continent, and therefore remains very instructive.  ‘E-commerce, explosive lucrative venture’ Rocket Internet is a leading global internet platform outside of the US and China, for creating companies from inception to finish. They function more than their status as a venture capitalist or incubator; bringing together all components needed to create a company. They are the main brain behind Africa’s biggest e-commerce business – Jumia.  It still remains a great debate whether to classify e-commerce as an internet start-up or a tech innovation, as in Jumia’s case, it is an online shopping business. But that is a separate issue. Jumia has defied the odds to overcome the poor transport and delivery infrastructural network on the continent to provide solutions using motorbikes and rickshaws. Not exactly the Indian dabbawalla meal delivery system that has been extolled to death, but it is a step in the right direction.  Other major players include Gloo and Konga. According to yStats.com, the African e-commerce business is forecasted to grow by 40 percent this year. This has been attributed to a growing middle class on the lookout for more convenient shopping experiences and better deals, which the online shops seem to offer. Improving internet connectivity on the continent has led to this surge, with Nigeria, South Africa, Egypt and Morocco as leaders. ‘Mobile technology, the heart and soul of Africa’s future growth?’ Mobile phones have provided the greatest venue for innovation in tech on the African continent. In an interview with Foreign Direct Investment (FDi) magazine, Robert Collymore, the current CEO of Safaricom maintains that telecommunications remains at the heart of Africa’s growth and will be critical in narrowing the region’s wealth divide. Mobile solutions have sprung up such as M-Pesa which means Mobile Money in Swahili and is widely used in Kenya and Tanzania. Though made popular by Kenya, Tanzania has surpassed Kenya in mobile money transactions as from this month. According to a survey carried out by GSMA, a trade association for mobile carriers, Tanzanians conducted transactions worth over $1.8 billion in December 2013 alone. In 2013, 44 percent of adults in Tanzania used mobile money compared to Kenya’s 38 percent. Meanwhile, in countries such as Cameroon, DRC, Kenya, Madagascar, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe, mobile money accounts surpass bank accounts says GSMA.  This goes to show that mobile money has made it easier for the local populace in Africa to engage in financial transactions without the prerequisite of banks to have a huge deposit before opening an account. The mobile money platform in East Africa has now extended into mobile savings accounts called M-Shwari. M-Shwari is made for M-Pesa customers, allowing them to save and borrow money through their phone while earning interest on their saved money. Start-ups on the continent are now infusing these technologies into their business models to make life easy for those living in rural areas. For example, Rafael Robert, a co-founder of Off Grid Electric, a clean solar-powered energy company, won this year’s International Ashden Award 2014 for using mobile money to power solar expansion in rural East Africa. The poor in rural Tanzania can now have light and buy credit to charge their lights, using mobile money, a huge convenience. Similarly, an electronic payment system for Cameroon called PURSAR is to be launched to ease transactions, with the scarcity of change which hinders purchases sometimes to protection from pickpockets being another perk. They have been crowdsourcing funds to help with their efforts on Indiegogo. Other related advantages brought on by mobile technology are its use to fight corruption, which is an endemic problem for many countries in Africa. In Tanzania, since introducing Mobile payments for road tax, Tanzania’s Revenue Authority (TRA) has seen tax revenue soar. Using the computerised integrated taxation system called iTax; TRA reported an increase of tax revenue from 25million USD per month in 1996 to 300 million USD per month by 2007. Technology can help Africans enhance efficiency, data security, transparency of processes and release staff from unproductive work. For those living far away from the cities, it saves them time and money travelling to government offices to pay the taxes in person.  ‘Solution-based technology’ Most recent tech innovations are addressing social problems such as the mPedigree created by Ghana’s Bright Simons to test the expiry dates of medications. In the long run, it should eliminate counterfeit drugs from African Streets. There is the recently created Cardiopad by the young Cameroonian engineer, Arthur Zhang, which won the 2014 Rolex Award. The cardiopad reads and electronically sends cardiac readings from patients in remote areas to cardiologists in the major cities who can then give diagnosis promptly. There is also the BRCK, which is a backup generator system for the internet, should the electricity go out, which is more common than those in the West can imagine. Nairobi-based BRCK was co-founded by Kenyan Juliana Rotich and two Americans, both raised in Africa – Philip Walton and Erik Hersman, including New Zealander Reg Orton. The list is not exhaustive but the market for solution-based technology in Africa is undisputedly growing. A 2013 report by McKinsey & Company placed Africa’s internet contribution to Gross Domestic Product at 18 billion USD; a staggering market with many vying to get a piece of the action. Similarly, the Ericsson Mobility Report on Africa, published on the KPMG blog, forecasted there will be over 635 million mobile subscriptions in Africa by the end of 2014. The same report reckons that by 2017, 3G technology will surpass 2G as the dominant form of regional connection. The report estimates that by the end of 2019, there should be over 930 million subscribers in sub-Saharan Africa, along with 557 million smartphones in use and 710 million active broadband subscriptions. The increase in data uptake is very much linked to the use of social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram among others. Many companies such as MTN, Tuluntulu are positioning themselves to revolutionise mobile broadcasting on the continent which will use little of purchased data but allow for streaming of videos seamlessly albeit on the slow bandwidth available on mostly 2G connections available at the moment. The opportunities exist but challenges abound in terms of skills, investment in the ICT (Information and Communications Technology) sector and empowerment. The major concern is that development in Africa’s technology will be led by outsiders. Kokumo Goodie writes in Biztechafrica.com on the widening ICT skills gap, which is a cause for concern. Goodie highlights that recent gains made in the technology sector could be wiped out by the widening skills gap of the locals, who will be losing out to offshore skilled manpower. He also emphasises that billions could be lost in foreign exchange to capital flight through repatriation of profits. Most jobs need a certain level of IT expertise but is the African continent equipping its graduates with the right skills, asks Goodie. He further states that the problem of unemployment may be less about no jobs but more about the skills available not being employable. Though he models his write-up on Nigeria, it is a continent-wide challenge. ‘Possible solutions’ There is a need for the government and private sector to invest heavily in world class equipment and software programmes that will allow students to be exposed to the world of technology and also become acquainted with its many subjects, to know which study to undertake. This is not to say that efforts are not being made, but it could use some added impetus. The limited and slow internet connectivity, coupled with how expensive it is to get a data plan, remains a major deterrent. Tenders for optic fibres in most African countries are operated under duopolies or monopolies, limiting competition and making pricing rigid and expensive. The government needs to liberalise the market more to allow other players to come in and provide choices for the African populace. Some countries have yet to switch to 3G when most of the world is already gravitating towards 4G connections. Resolving the connectivity problem will ensure that many people in the rural areas can have access to internet connectivity. Another challenge for developers on the continent has been getting access to venture capitalists. Most of the investors courted are from overseas, which mean those without connections or access to these VCs could find their innovations fall by the wayside. There is a direct correlation between getting investors and being able to demonstrate to them that there will be an uptake of the application or software on offer. In this area, lie a hindrance in the…

Weddings Gone Mad.

This is a little bit of digression from my usual beat but I could not help but share. Who feels strongly that weddings these days are getting out of hand? Are the brides or grooms becoming too entitled simply by the fact they are walking down the aisle? Are their expectations taking the life out…

Say it in Your Native Language with Oystext

As the world increasingly becomes more interconnected and global, there is the need for us all to speak one language. Progress in interconnection in the digital age has grown tremendously. What has recently presented itself to bridge that gap or barrier in communication? None other than OYSTEXT. With a name inspired by the Oyster card…